"And in a bar: Zada se zdvorile, by se nehovorilo o politice – Customers are kindly requested not to talk politics."

— “HHhH”, Laurent Binet

"But between 1800 and 1850, at the most conservative estimate, about 1,800 people were transported to Australia from England for political “crimes.” Among them were representatives of nearly every protest movement known to the British Government, so that Australia received samples (if not big influxes) of most working-class movements. Frame-breaking Luddites were sent out in 1812–13, and food rioters from East Anglia in 1816. Fourteen members of the betrayed Pentridge Rising near Nottingham were exiled in 1817, and five dazed fanatics from the Cato Street Conspiracy—which had absurdly hoped to set off a general insurrection of English workers by assassinating Lord Sidmouth’s cabinet as its members sat down to dinner—came in 1820. Radical weavers from Scotland in 1820 and from Yorkshire in 1821, rioters from Bristol in 1831 and Wales in 1835; Swing rioters and machine-breakers in the early 1830s, the Tolpuddle Martyrs in 1834, more than 100 Chartists between 1839 and 1848—all went to Australia."

— “The Fatal Shore”, Robert Hughes

"AUSTRALIA WAS the official Siberia for Irish dissidents at the turn of the century."

— “The Fatal Shore”, Robert Hughes

"The judge—Robert Macqueen, Lord Braxfield, Lord Justice Clerk of Scotland—brushed that aside, as he had been told to do. He was a coarse cunning old drunk whose remarks during this trial won long notoriety. (When one of the Jacobins pointed out that Christ himself had been a reformer, Braxfield chuckled and snorted: “Muckle he made o’ that—He was hanget.”) From such a man, Muir was unlikely to escape, whatever his forensic skills."

— “The Fatal Shore”, Robert Hughes

"Lavache is protected by his irony and his distance, but simultaneously he is trapped, marginal, without a centre: he literally barely has a leg to stand on. He exudes what Wallace would later call “the ‘moral clarity’ of the immature”."

— “Every Love Story is a Ghost Story: A Life of David Foster Wallace”, DT Max

"I had no problem with what they were saying, but the writing was lame. It had nothing to inspire confidence or arouse the passions. And the round man’s speech was just as bad - the same old tune with different words. The true enemy of this bunch was not State Power but Lack of Imagination."

— “Norwegian Wood”, Haruki Murakami

"What a joke. The wind changes direction a little, and their cries become whispers."

— “Norwegian Wood”, Haruki Murakami

"

Tanner flashed a smile. ‘Juries love me, Nick. I’m one of them.’

‘You’re the opposite of one of them, Tanner.’

‘Reverse that: They’d like to think they’re one of me.’

"

— “Gone Girl”, Gillian Flynn

"

When our men finished singing, without a request from the army side, the militia started another song, which was also a quotation from Chairman Mao:

“A revolution is not a dinner party, or writing an essay, or painting a picture, or doing embroidery; it cannot be so refined, so leisurely and gentle, so temperate, kind, courteous, restrained, and magnanimous. A revolution is an insurrection, an act of violence by which one class overthrows another.”

So they sang.

"

— “Ocean of Words”, Ha Jin

"

Lear himself casts off his old manner, his sanity, his clothes; it is a process, violent beyond belief, of unravelling, unhousing, and undressing, until the king is out in a storm with his few remaining loyal subjects and, for the first time in his life, senses what poor and miserable people must suffer:

"Poor naked wretches, wheresoe’er you are,
That bide the pelting of this pitiless storm,
How shall your houseless heads and unfed sides,
Your looped and windowed raggedness, defend you
From seasons such as these? O, I have ta’en
Too little care of this! Take physic, pomp;
Expose thyself to feel what wretches feel,
That thou mayst shake the superflux to them
And show the heavens more just.”

"

“Great Books”, David Denby

A bit more than living on the dole for a week…

"In general (according to Dante), private and appetitive sins were not as grave as violence against God or self; sins against the community were graver still; and political treachery the worst sin of all. In brief, the welfare of the community determines the scheme of punishment. The knave who tells secrets to the wrong person, or splits allies, or leaves the gates open so the enemy may enter creates disaster for everyone."

— “Great Books”, David Denby

"(In Dante’s Inferno) One progressed downward into greater degrees of sin and punishment, a torment set aside for every vice and error, ending at the frozen pit, where even tears turned to ice. There, at the bottom, three-headed Lucifer chews on Brutus and Cassius, the betrayers of Caesar; and on Judas, who betrayed Christ."

— “Great Books”, David Denby

"(According to Machiavelli) Simplicity and consistency – what most of us would call political morality – are not possible for a Prince, because his acts invariably change the context in which subsequent acts must take place. He continually creates his own reality. That is the nature of power. By necessity, in order to adjust to the changes created by his own acts, he must dissemble, shift, appear to be virtuous when he is not. The delayed, two-pronged wit in Machiavelli was produced by his dynamic notion of reality, in which one exercise of power always sets the ground for the next."

— “Great Books”, David Denby

"You ask me to stand, as I have always done, at a kingly distance from the human, which in my kingly role, as you say, I can have no part in. But I am also a father. Mightn’t it be time for me to expose myself at last to what is merely human?"

— “Ransom”, David Malouf

"The integration of immigrants in Australia has been an overwhelming success. It is no mean feat that dramatic changes in the ethnic and cultural composition of Australia have taken place without widespread social disruption. At the end of the Second World War, Australia’s population was overwhelming Anglo-Celtic, with well over 90 per cent of the population being of Anglo-Celtic stock. Today around 25 per cent of Australians were born overseas, with close to 45 per cent having at least one parent who was an immigrant."

— “Don’t go back to where you came from” - Tim Soutphommasane